Tenants in Britain could get the legal right to have a pet, so they don’t have to miss out on having a dog or cat as a friend. The problems between landlords and tenants are finally being fixed. Landlords are now required to take care of the homes they rent out and don’t have to turn away people with pets who want to rent their homes. To be honest, it’s a breath of fresh air. Soon, landlords will have to let their renters keep pets in the homes they rent.

Image credits: Gilloute (not the actual photo)

The change, which is part of “The Renters’ Reform Bill,” is just the tip of the iceberg of what is thought to be the biggest change to the private rented sector in 30 years. A government source told the Daily Mail, “Not only will our new deal for renters bring the decent homes standard to the private rented sector, but we’ll also give tenants the legal right to have a pet if they want.

Image credits: Flickr( not the actual pic)

As part of the changes that Housing Secretary Michael Gove announced on June 16, fixed-term tenancies will be banned and replaced with open-ended agreements. This way, renters will only have to move when there is a good reason to. Also, the so-called “no-fault” Section 21 evictions, which allow tenants to be kicked out without a reason, will be taken away. Lastly, landlords will have to give back rent if they don’t keep their homes in good shape. Daily Mail says that right now, one in five of the places people rent is not good enough to live in. Standards for social housing will be put into place for private rentals so that people don’t have to live in damp, dangerous, and cold places. But there will also be steps to make it easier for good landlords to get their properties back from bad tenants.

Only 5-7% of landlords advertised as ‘pet-friendly’ in 2021, when the number of private renters was 4.43 million

Image credits: Flickr(not the actual pic)

Many people know that having a pet is good for you. From relieving stress to giving you someone to talk to, pets can make your very lonely time spent curled up in bed, watching a Netflix show while thinking about the passing of time and the end of the world that much more bearable.

So why haven’t private renters in the UK, who numbered 4.43 million in 2021, being able to have pets until now? Pets: The main problem with pets is that they are not real. They say, “There’s this idea that dogs and cats run around and chew and scratch furniture and are very bad. […] How can a landlord or freeholder tell you that you can’t live with your pets? Since half of the people in the UK have pets, this is a very short-sighted move by landlords.

Image credits: Erica Firment (not the actual photo)

A survey found that 38% of people with pets “did not feel comfortable asking their landlord for permission,” with one third struggling to find a property to rent

Image credits: House Buy Fast (not the actual photo)

And yet the issue stands strong. Dogs Today Magazine said that a survey found that 38 percent of people “did not feel comfortable asking their landlord for permission to keep a pet,” and that almost a third of pet owners had trouble finding a place to rent.

Almost 20% of pet owners have thought about giving up their pets in order to find a place to live. Because of this, too many pet owners risk having to choose between their pets and a place to live when they need to find a place to rent.

In 2021, only 5–7 percent of landlords advertised that their homes were pet-friendly, and many of them said it was because pets meant “higher maintenance costs. The Cats Protection charity has been trying to get these rules changed because it thinks that more than a million renter households would like to have a cat but can’t because they don’t own their own home.

Image credits: flicker(not the actual pic)

The Dogs and Domestic Animals Accommodation Protection Bill’s sponsor, MP Andrew Rosindell, said that for most people, being separated from a pet is like being separated from a brother or sister. He said, “Unfortunately, pet owners who move into rented housing face the possibility that their family could be split up because most landlords in Britain have unnecessary bans or restrictions on pet ownership.

Image credits: Roger Ahlbrand (not the actual photo)

In light of this, a government source said, “Landlords are unfairly keeping people who want a pet from having the company and companionship of an animal. We’ll change the law to stop this unfairness. So, according to the Telegraph, the Renters’ Reform Bill will be a welcome big change that will make it easier for landlords to ban pets, children, and people on welfare.

If a property owner doesn’t want a tenant to have an animal in their home, they will need a good reason. When they do say no, the tenants will be able to question their decision.


Image credits: Martin Pettitt (not the actual photo)

Michael Gove will also try to make it possible for landlords to ask for insurance to cover any damage that pets might cause. The National Residential Landlords Association (NRLA) says that the insurance would help protect landlords. Chris Norris of the NRLA said, “Our biggest concern has always been that the law, as it stands now, prevents landlords from requiring insurance to cover the significant risk of pets causing damage to property.

Housing Secretary Michael Gove will aim to give landlords the power to request insurance to cover any potential damage caused by pets

Image credits: Flickr( not the actual pic)

We’re glad to hear that the government has heard us and acted in a positive way. Mr. Norris also said that when thinking about what kind of housing is best for a pet, an undefined He said, “In shared homes, the rights of those who want to have a pet need to be balanced with the rights of other tenants who might be worried, especially those with certain allergies.

Image credits: Gordon (not the actual photo)

Due to the housing crisis, this will help improve the lives of people who have to pay, according to The Guardian, 8.3% more in rent, which is the biggest price increase in 13 years. Demand for rental homes went through the roof in the new year, with 76 percent more people looking for a home than in the same time period between 2018 and 2021. Even though there is more demand, there are not more homes for rent.

Image credits: Tom Lee (not the actual photo)

In January, there were 39�fewer homes for rent than there usually are at the beginning of the year. Because there aren’t enough homes to rent, prices have gone up and there’s a lot of competition for rental homes. It seems to be the first big step in the right direction, toward more inclusion and a better quality of life. Even though we still have a long way to go and prices are continuing to go up, at least we’ll be able to hold our pets next to us while the world burns. All of you who don’t live in the UK, are you jealous? Would you want all places to follow the same laws? Tell us what you think in the comments!

People have applauded this step, and many are celebrating the change. Let us know what you think in the comments!

Every Private Tenant In UK To Get Legal Right To Keep A Pet In “Biggest Shake-Up Of The Private Rented Sector In 30 Years”
Every Private Tenant In UK To Get Legal Right To Keep A Pet In “Biggest Shake-Up Of The Private Rented Sector In 30 Years”
Every Private Tenant In UK To Get Legal Right To Keep A Pet In “Biggest Shake-Up Of The Private Rented Sector In 30 Years”
Every Private Tenant In UK To Get Legal Right To Keep A Pet In “Biggest Shake-Up Of The Private Rented Sector In 30 Years”
Every Private Tenant In UK To Get Legal Right To Keep A Pet In “Biggest Shake-Up Of The Private Rented Sector In 30 Years”
Every Private Tenant In UK To Get Legal Right To Keep A Pet In “Biggest Shake-Up Of The Private Rented Sector In 30 Years”
Every Private Tenant In UK To Get Legal Right To Keep A Pet In “Biggest Shake-Up Of The Private Rented Sector In 30 Years”
Every Private Tenant In UK To Get Legal Right To Keep A Pet In “Biggest Shake-Up Of The Private Rented Sector In 30 Years”

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