What’s the real point of this sort of gesture if it’s never cashed down? This may be a relevant question for content creator Grace Johanna put forth in another of her TikToks.

Filming herself in her car, Grace shared what sort of visit that is apparently routine at Starbucks ended in a discussion on morality.

Everything started when she got caught in a streak that was pay-it-forward in which, in line with the girl, the earlier five clients had been shamed into conformity rather than enjoying themselves a delicacy.

Meet Grace Johanna, a creator that is content, broke a pay-it-forward streak in a Starbucks because, well, that’s the point of it.

Woman Breaks A Starbucks ‘Pay It Forward’ Streak And Explains Why She’s Refusing To Be Shamed For It
Image credits: gracejohanna

However, not everyone was a fan of her decision, so the woman explained her reasoning behind it in a TikTok video.

Woman Breaks A Starbucks ‘Pay It Forward’ Streak And Explains Why She’s Refusing To Be Shamed For It
Woman Breaks A Starbucks ‘Pay It Forward’ Streak And Explains Why She’s Refusing To Be Shamed For It
Woman Breaks A Starbucks ‘Pay It Forward’ Streak And Explains Why She’s Refusing To Be Shamed For It
Image credits: Kadarius Seegars (not the actual photo)

Woman Breaks A Starbucks ‘Pay It Forward’ Streak And Explains Why She’s Refusing To Be Shamed For It
Woman Breaks A Starbucks ‘Pay It Forward’ Streak And Explains Why She’s Refusing To Be Shamed For It
Image credits: gracejohanna
Woman Breaks A Starbucks ‘Pay It Forward’ Streak And Explains Why She’s Refusing To Be Shamed For It
Woman Breaks A Starbucks ‘Pay It Forward’ Streak And Explains Why She’s Refusing To Be Shamed For It
Woman Breaks A Starbucks ‘Pay It Forward’ Streak And Explains Why She’s Refusing To Be Shamed For It

Woman Breaks A Starbucks ‘Pay It Forward’ Streak And Explains Why She’s Refusing To Be Shamed For It
Image credits: gracejohanna
Woman Breaks A Starbucks ‘Pay It Forward’ Streak And Explains Why She’s Refusing To Be Shamed For It

In the study, the authors wrote in The New York Times that “we found that getting and watching generosity can both significantly increase your probability of being generous toward a complete stranger, but that you become a “bystander” who feels that help is no longer needed.” In the event that you observe a high enough level of generosity, your willingness to greatly help suffers.

In an online market where users promote tasks to be finished in exchange for cash because of their test, Tsvetkova and Macy recruited more than 600 participants from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. That they had to relax and play exactly what the invite ended up being called by the scientists’ game. The individuals had been informed, if they received an email invitation, that they might be involved in the overall game and make a base repayment in cash and a money bonus—but just

To get the game started, we created an invitation, which we sent to a few arbitrarily chosen individuals. People who received invites were then informed that they had been assigned to play the game in a mixed group of 150 people, Tsvetkova and Macy explained.

“Each ‘invitee’ had the option of sending an additional invitation to a complete stranger in his team if he returned the bonus and just earned the base reimbursement. That invitation would be sent to the stranger in an anonymous manner.”

The clip was viewed over 1.4 million times

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